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Monday, April 3, 2017

The worm turned.

Or, more specifically, the butt-head rooster, Peckito, turned into a jerk.  He's been giving me the Hairy Eyeball for a while now and making little he-man runs at me.  He also has been beating the snot out of Bunny and is hard on the hens.  It was just a matter of time.


Spurred!
When I went into the coop yesterday to gather eggs before my egg-eater got to them (she's next on the list), I heard him coming and wheeled around, throwing my hand up in front of my face.  Bugger.
I grabbed him by the ankle, whacked him a few times and jettisoned him over the high fence.  He's on his own.


Saturday brought snow, sleet, rain, snow, more sleet and more snow.  My seed-starting workshop was postponed until next week, darnit.  We were all a little melancholy.


Spring, where art thou?
Luckily, we only had to get through Saturday to get a little teensy taste of what spring is actually like.  The sun came out, the breezes were soft and we all went a little crazy - me, with my rake and shovel; the dogs - just crazy.  Aleve has become my best friend.  I met a friend for breakfast early in the morning in a quaint little village near where I used to live.  It has become completely "precious", as in expensive and exclusive.  Too bad.  However, the one bright spot (besides my Maggie), is the yarn shop.  Oh, be still my heart.  It is becoming apparent that I need adult supervision in yarn shops. 


I made it back home in time to change to shoveling clothes and trotted out to the sheep yard.  Where I shoveled.  And shoveled.  And did more shoveling.  My lord, can that llama produce the beans!  I raked, too, and started to set  up my big composting area - which has to be finished before the coop-cleaning can commence.  By the time I'm finished, I will be awash in compost.  How nice!  I dragged out all the Christmas tree skeletons from the sheep yard, too, and surveyed the encroaching erosion problem in the back.  I think I have devised a plan for at least holding it back until a more permanent solution can be arrived at. 


I also did my weekend cooking sans the planned bread-baking, as Maggie and I had breakfast at one of my favorite little bakery/eateries that has specialized in Gluten Free baking.  I picked up two loaves of GF bread that is locally made and cheaper than grocery-store GF bread.  I was/am a happy camper.  Thanks to my glut of eggs, I made an asparagus/mushroom/onion quiche with a potato crust.  Yummers!  I also made the chicken rolls again - I think that is now my favorite way to each chicken. 


This week is chock-full of early morning errands - starting with having had to be in the office early to reprogram all our phones.  The IT guy started in on, "and then you need to pull up the ITL files and wipe them via the Ethernet gobbledygook..."  When he asked me if I had any questions, I said, "Yes, I don't understand anything after "and then you need".  Please put it in very, very, very basic language.  Sheesh.  Anyhow, it seems that everything has gone without a hitch, except for one phone.  There's always one.  Tuesday I have to take a friend to the train in the city by 8A, which means leaving my house at 7A.  At least I will be able to leave early, since they are adamantly against overtime.  As am I.  I'm hoping that there will be enough non-rain/snow weather when I get home this week to enable me to start on some outdoor projects.  Time's awastin!



24 comments:

  1. Holy moley, that rooster attack was scary! If you hadn't put up your hand to fend him off . . . you may have made him a "wild" rooster by telling him he was on his own now . . . but couldn't he still come after you? Around here he would be in the stew pot by now.

    Thanks for the reminder of quiche. We, too, have eggs coming out of our ears (and refrigerator) so that's a good idea for this week. No asparagus for ours though. I can't bring myself to buy it (high priced) so I'm holding out for our own crop to come in. Which may be in August the way our weather is going.

    Hope the week goes well for you, my friend.

    P.S. You know how Elmer Fudd sings, "Kill da wabbit, kill da wabbit . . . " I say, "Kill da wooster, kill da wooster . . . "

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    1. Oh, if he doesn't get picked off, I will be doing it myself, all right. It's just that I didn't want to give him another opportunity to have at me. He can't get over the fence, so he's not a danger to me at present. I love that Elmer Fudd reference - I was/am a real Bugs Bunny fan!

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  2. I would have plucked that B@%T@RD alive and thrown him in the oven.
    Keep it clean........and ditto Mama Pea---if he comes back for more, stew pot or roasting pan. Your choice

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  3. Garbage can lids work wonders to teach a rooster a little respect.

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  4. Ouch! That looks nasty. He won't ne back will he?

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    1. Theresa, he's lurking, but keeping a safe distance. He cannot get over the high fence. So far.

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  5. the bastard rooster can become a part of your new favorite meal!

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    1. Ordinarily, I would have trussed him up, but I was not prepared to process him, so he got a reprieve, of sorts.

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  6. Ew, swine rooster! I bet he'd taste good in a nice Karma Soup!

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  7. Hi Susan, thank you for visiting my blog. I enjoyed this post. Several years ago (when we kept chickens, we no longer do) there was a nasty little banty rooster named Rusty, who disliked me and hated our son, but tolerated my husband. I always said he had "little man syndrome". Jettison, indeed! -Jenn

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    1. Jenn - I was so happy to find your blog! Bantys are the worst, in my experience. The only good thing is that they are short.

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  8. I also noticed a picture of Michael Schmidt in your sidebar. He's from my neck of the woods and is quite a controversial character! (the one that says, "got freedom?") Funny to see him on your blog from New York when he is often in our local newspapers. -Jenn

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    1. Jenn, I will have to do some research. Access to raw milk is something near and dear to my heart.

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  9. When my rooster chased me and spurred me from shoulders to ankles when I was four, Mama told me he would do that every time. And, would it bother me if we ate him. I very happily ate the pully bone and never had a regret.

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    1. Linda - Ouch! You poor kid! I wonder if your pully bone and my wish bone are the same part. They can be nasty customers, those roosters.

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  10. Susan,

    What's with that Rooster?? I would have thrown him over the fence as well to prevent further injuries. I'm thinking it's freezer camp for this booger.....

    Enjoy yarn and yarn shops!!!

    Hugs,
    Sandy

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    1. Sandy - Hey, girl! If he is careless enough to get within range (and if he lasts out there in the wilderness), off to freezer camp he goes. xoxo

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  11. I'm so glad you commented on my blog, I love yours :D I had a rooster like yours, he was 'relocated' after going for my face one too many times!!! I would have eaten him, but my daughter forbade it!
    I need supervision in the yarn shop too, but not my daughter, she's worse than I am! I had to hide a new haul yesterday, eek!

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    1. Yarrow - Ditto, my dear! I know what you mean - if I don't start on a project or five soon, it will mean trouble.

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  12. Ouch! What a little snot! Will he be on the dinner menu one of these days? That's a great idea to use potato for a quiche crust. We're gluten free around here too. How nice that you have a bakery nearby to get more affordable gf bread. We had one gf bakery but it closed.

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  13. We had one rooster like that. He went to another farm. That hand looks painful. Ouch!

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