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Saturday, February 7, 2015

Check!

Since I seem to be spending all of my precious vacation days shoveling snow, I decided to quit widging and whining and do something more constructive with my time.  After I shovel, that is.

So, during the latest snocation day (Thursday), I completed my seed order for this year's garden.  (With a very special thanks to Sue for inadvertently directing me to Dixondale Farms!)  I will admit to a rather hysterical, it's-the-end-of-the-world-as-I-know-it kind of approach this year.  I usually calmly sit down and map out my beds on my graph paper.  Then I thoughtfully review last years goods/bads.  Then I studiously pore through all the seed catalogs, conscientiously noting price differences and organic, heirloom, sustainable seeds.  Right.  Quite frankly, I have a large amount of leftover seeds (see photo below) which I should be using exclusively.  But I am so fickle and superficial that I am easily swayed by pretty pictures....ding! drool!  (Pavlov reference...)

Notice large container of leftover
seeds...
More honestly, this year's approach has been one of unquiet desperation - ripping through catalogs looking for solace in the photographs.  Some salient thoughts did burble up once in a while - less chard for the g/d voles; not so many beets (see previous); MORE SHALLOTS - but it was pretty much an ugly, disorganized affair.

Some changes - I'm switching to a pole variety for my green beans this year.  After being painfully curled in an "C" shape trying to find ripe beans last year, I've decided that pole beans have just got to be better.  Oh, and I also happened to get a nice pile o'bean seeds free from my pal in PA.  The yeller beans will still be bush types, but they're easier to see.  How's that for scientific gardening practices?

Only one type of winter squash this year.  Blue Hubbard.  They were the only squash that produced through the wilt last year.  And since I am trying desperately to find a spot that is not tainted by the stuff, having only one type to plant makes more sense.  (See?  It's all science-based.)

I've switched my seed potato loyalty from Fedco (they still get all my vege seed business, such as it is) to Peaceful Valley.  Even though I fear this is environmentally/carbonly incorrect, as Fedco is in Maine and PV is in California, the difference in the price for organic seed potato is amazing. 

This is the Year of Elderberries.  Or so I hope.  I am trying to diversify my 'crops'.

I am going to build a little greenhouse for a longer season of greens.  Especially because I am going to be growing five kinds of kale!  (This is the danger of ordering seeds when you are sitting and staring at another foot of snow on top of the three feet that were there already.)

Yes, Thursday a foot of snow fell on 'my special spot', as I am wont to call it now.  Less than three inches fell in the city.  Sigh.  It's not easy being geographically 'special'.  Or should that be 'challenged'? 

Quit musing, lady, and open the damn door!
It is getting so bad that I am running out of places to put the snow when I shovel.  The deck is piled up level to my head.  I am trying to break Pepper (hahahaha) of the habit of racing out to the coop to hunt for his favorite "treats".  Inevitably, after I have yelled at him to come in for ten minutes, he gets too cold to continue the journey back and I am having to suit up and go rescue him.  I tell you, being guardian to a doxie really keeps you on your toes.  Even though he is the last one served, he manages to Hoover up his dinner so quickly that he races over and bullies Scrappy out of his bowl (my boy is such a marshmallow).  So I am now feeding him in Lovey's crate with the door firmly latched.  Take that, Devil Dog.

5 comments:

  1. Susan,

    Like you, I raced through all of my catalogs....then finally place my order. All my seeds were delivered, and now I'm starting to prepare for planting in my green house. My onions were recently planted outside, those were ordered from Dixiondale. This will be the first year using this company, they were recommended to me by Sandy over at the Texan Blog.

    Don't you just hate it when you have no more room to put the snow...lol... To bad you couldn't throw it in an area to create a pond for the future.

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    1. Sandy - I haven't received any of my seeds/starts yet, but our planting season is a LOONG way off!

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  2. What a great photo. Let us in! I'm still working on my seed order. I have tons of saved seeds but can never resist ordering out of those catalogs! I think they're therapeutic for the winter doldrums - with snow or without.

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    1. Leigh - They certainly are. You can spend hours just paging through and imagining all that lush greenness and all those perfect vegetables! Of course my reality is a little different...

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  3. We are struggling with this years plans as the land purchase is a go...but the delays and decisions yet to be made are going to take some time.
    Hubbards are tough and tasty...thats how we pick em!

    hang in there with your snow!

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