Pages

Friday, February 20, 2015

Enough of the vagaries of my life. Let's get down to business.

Pepper in a contemplative moment.  Possibly
remembering green grass.
While I have been rusting on my laurels, celebrating the fact that all major pathways have been shoveled and maintained, a dim bulb went on when I realized that I needed to get more hay.  Thanks to the relentless duo of frigid temps and near-constant snowfall, access to the barn on the human side is extremely limited.  Getting into and out of the door (especially out of, with a half-bale of hay in my arms) is like doing the sideways limbo.  Suck in that gut! 

One of these years, I will think ahead.  Then I got an email from my propane supplier reminding us that we need to be kind to our delivery guys and make sure that they have clear access to tanks.  Oh.  In order for my propane to be delivered, you have to make it through the gate in the chicken yard fence, through the chicken yard, around the corner of the house and into the tank.  Do you want to take a guess at how much of that is shoveled?  I have been pretty good at keeping the gate clear, having learned my lesson on how much more work it is to drag 50# bags of chicken feed through the house, across the deck, down the stairs and out to the coop.  I chipped a short path to the tank to check the level (35%) and I just might be able to hold out until the end of March.

I am not letting it get me down, however, because I have reached that point in February when the delusion delirium (DD) sets in.  That time when, after peeking ahead to the forecast into the next month or so, I know it won't last forever, this forever-seeming winter.  There is a light at the end of this Arctic tunnel.  It usually coincides with the arrival of my seed order.  In a few short weeks, the sap lines will appear in the woods around me.  I will be cutting up my bars of Irish Spring soap to hang from my willow bushes.  About a half-ton of dog 'business' will be unearthed/snowed in the chicken yard.  I will find a renewed will to knit (as perverse as that sounds, it always happens).

I have quite a few projects to be completed this year.  I can so relate to Mama Pea's double-spaced two page to-do list...some of them will be challenging: crawling under the house to the far end to see what damage has been done to the insulation around my master bath pipes.  And fixing it.  I'm claustrophobic and am sure that the damage was done during the Great Rat Outbreak.  Nuff said.  And there is the roofing of the run-in shed (heights).  And lining at least two raised beds with hardware cloth (the cursed voles).  But I am floating in the soft glow of DD and it all sounds marvelous...

Now for some True Confessions.  I spent 5.99 at the grocery store.  I went in to pick up some things for my parents, who have been snowbound, and I bought organic baby spinach from Massachusetts because I couldn't walk by the bin.  Not bad and all that, but, still.  I blame my weakness on lack of iron in my diet - ergo, the spinach.  Right?  Right??

17 comments:

  1. I sure hope the weather turns for the better for you soon. And I agree, while I'm hemmed in, I can make a to-do list a mile long.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DFW - It is starting to look hopeful, with the temps actually getting above freezing (or so 'they' say) on Sunday!!! It's funny about lists - even when you're not doing anything, you feel like you're accomplishing something!

      Delete
  2. Not long now for all of us either buried under or freezing our digits off - roll on spring! May I ask - why do you hang up Irish Spring soap? I know we put bars of it around in our motor home when we put it to bed for the winter to keep mice away but I am intrigued!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mrs DM - The soap is is to keep the deer from chewing off all the new shoots on my willow hedge. I kept wondering why it was not spreading as it ought to have - the deer were eating each new shoot as it appeared. It also makes you wonder what would happen if you actually washed with the soap..... :)

      Delete
  3. If a tub o' spinach is all you've bought---WOW! You are doing terrific. And no one is gonna fault you for that--who could resist GREEN STUFF toward the end of a hellish winter.
    Best to you

    ReplyDelete
  4. Six buck bag o' baby spinach? In the middle of the gawdawful blindingwhite everyting is dead winter? Don't think of it as breaking your pantry challenge but purchasing something for your mental well being.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carolyn - It was a big tub o' baby spinach, so that should get me over the hump. Your description of this winter is spot-on perfect.

      Delete
  5. Must be Spring, I'm wanting to dust (plenty of opportunity there). Safety note-please tell someone where you are going before you start crawling under the house, we don't want a repeat of falling over in the snow, do we. Or take a sheep with you so they can bleat for help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan - DUST? You should try my method - squinting. Don't worry, I will tie a rope to my ankle just in case. Unfortunately, I don't think I would be able to shove a sheep in there - they are even 'fluffier' than I am!

      Delete
  6. Didn't I tell you I was worried about you doing without any greens this winter? No wonder you're getting a little whacky (whackier than usual . . . did I just say that?). You need a good dose of green tonic. I can be bossy to you because deep down in my little black heart I know I could never go all winter without shopping for some vital food items as you have. Envy. Jealousy. Begrudgement.(?) Call it what you will. You're taking one for the (self-sufficient) team. You're a better (wo)man than I am. By far.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Maybe spring will come early? You guys deserve it back there, although hopefully not FLOODING!!! I have been eating huge amounts of kale from the store, craving it :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. I absolutely have no idea what you ladies are going through. I'm from the south and if we get 2 inches, heck even an inch of snow, it shuts us down. I really do feel for you, though. I would probably have cabin fever so bad by now that I surely would have delirium. And I'm glad you bought the spinach. When your body craves it, your body needs it. Praying for an early thaw for you. Take care.

    ReplyDelete
  9. If that is all you spent, you are doing great!

    ReplyDelete
  10. The snow has certainly been a challenge in some parts of the country. We get forecasts for snow, but it's usually a no show. Ice, on the other hand, is a thread because it brings down power lines and trees. No good.

    ReplyDelete
  11. P.S. I can't thank you enough for your reviews on my book! They are truly the key to sales.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Susan,

    Keep your chin up girl, the snow will be gone soon!!!!
    It's hard to pass up fresh spinach. I wouldn't count this as going to the grocery store ;-)

    ReplyDelete