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Monday, March 28, 2011

Lots Doin'

Thanks to a downed DSL since Saturday morning, there has been no posting - no downloading of pix, either.  And no lambs, dagnabit.  Just when I think that Freyda can't go another five minutes, she continues blissfully along, chewing her cud.  I did get photographs of their large bee-hinds, but cannot download until my Internet service is restored.  A very nice young man at Fairport's technical help line, for whom English is not a first language, told me they are "very, very, very" busy and it may be some long while.  I will take my payment off auto-pilot and reduce it in daily increments until I have full service.

A little excitement was had yesterday on the homestead.  I heard a ruckus outside that included the ducks -- a new wrinkle -- so I raced out to the deck in time to see a large mink chasing the chickens around the yard.  I let the dogs go and Bernie herded him into the now-empty coop, where I slammed the door shut.  Meanwhile, Scrapping was sidling off to a far corner of the yard, nonchalantly peeing his way in the opposite direction.  Killer, he is not.  I figured a rifle would not be appropriate in such a small space, so I called in a neighbor who drove up a few minutes later, pistol in hand.  At first I thought the mink had managed to get out, but I spotted him trying to become one with the shadows in a lower nesting box.  Crafty fellow.  The neighbor dispatched him and I buried him over the fence, a very healthy male specimen.  I would have felt badly about it if it had been almost anything but a mink/weasel/vicious killer.

Over at the farm, I whipped up an Apple Cobbler Cake for the barn crew to celebrate Jasmine's freshening, and the arrival of tiny Alice.  Alice continues to thrive - and she is, if I do say so myself, the cutest, smartest sweetest calf in the world.  Even the farmer, who is rather numb to calf-cuteness, called her a "cute little feller".  I am trying to get a better shot of her, but she is very bouncy when I'm there - I mean "bottle".  Who could ask for anything more?

13 comments:

  1. What is it with our ewes??? I KNOW when Annabelle and Bronwen were due; the back-up ram was only in with them 24 hours. But they keep chowing down and chewing their cud.... This week our schedule ramps back up and I can't be here all the time. GRRRRR

    I've never seen a mink in person. I'll bet he was beautiful. Too bad you couldn't have at least saved his pelt (not that I could have skinned him!).

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  2. Michelle - Right?? Why are they torturing us? Is it too much to ask that they lamb on a weekend? Before 9a? Yeah - he had a beautiful pelt but they are musky.

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  3. Oh I can't wait to see more pictures of Alice! I take it your dogs don't bother the chickens either?? That's pretty cool!

    Sometimes ya gotta do what ya gotta do! I've never seen a mink either, but would have done the same.

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  4. APG - the dogs don't bother the chickens if I am standing out there watching their every move! I would NEVER trust my dogs - or any others - unsupervised amongst my chickens. They (chickens) are just too tempting. All that noise and feathers, and flapping around. They are on their best behavior when they know I'm watching.

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  5. Gosh I am not sure I would trust any of our dogs even if I were standing right there. You must have much better behaved doggies than I do :) The lab would only be allowed IF she had her 'collar' on. Sorry, that may sound mean but she is a darn good dog with that there thing on!!

    ZZZT!

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  6. Go, Bernie! You have a cookie coming next time I visit!

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  7. Melanie - Yes, she is a good girl. You would never guess that, under her sweet, shy demeanor, there lurks a killer!

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  8. You did the right thing by getting rid of that chicken chasing predator. We once had a pine marten get into our pullet house and kill every single one of our 25 new pullets. That was a blood bath I don't want to see again.

    I think you need to toss those ewes into the back end of a truck and take them for a ride on a bumpy road. They be needin' some jarrin' loose!

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  9. I'm glad you got that mink and the dogs trapped it without getting hurt, they are vicious and hate to think of what he could have done to the poultry - good job being vigilant!

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  10. Mama Pea - Heehee, I could just see me trying to heave those big mamas into the back of the station wagon! We have some good-sized potholes that would do the trick, not to mention all the heaves in the road.

    Erin, I have to credit the roosters - even though Junior, who has always been a tad hysterical, is now a total hysteric - screeching every time a crow flies over. I think he's on the "to-cull" list.

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  11. Well I think Freyda is a watched pot. Never going to boil. Look away for a while and bet you come back to a lamb. I will be happy to send my hawks and eagles your way. I never have predators with them around. Of course they eat the chickens too. Double edged sword.

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  12. Jane - Bring them on! I have so many wild rabbits that I don't think they'd notice the chickens. Someone here has been shooting the coyotes, which has thrown everything out of balance. Fools.

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  13. Thank goodness you checked out the ruckus and that it was taken care of. :) Those darn weasels. Glad the chickens (and the dogs) escaped unharmed. :)

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