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Monday, May 16, 2016

Equal parts

It's interesting how exhilarated I get when my weekends get jam-packed with 'must-dos' on the list.  Maybe it's the fact that I am connected to the world again - or at least the parts of it that mean the most to me.  It sure wasn't due to the weather.  It was a weekend of equal parts frustrating activities and satisfying activities.   Without further ado - recipients of the satisfying part of the weekend:
Ducklings at 1 month out for
the first time.
 
Apria, or LaLa seems happy
to be on grass again.

Norman - always photogenic, my
Cormo/Pony cross.
 
Juno - my problem child
for the week.
 
Linden - my problem child
the rest of the time.
 
The Patient

I thought you'd like evidence that the LLF dependents are still alive and kicking.  I spent most of last week wringing my hands over Juno, my elderly ewe.  She has struggled with a parasite load and seemed to be doing okay, when I came home from work Monday to find her with Bottle Jaw.  A quick message via FB to my friend, AnnMarie - my sheep/goat/llama guru, brought her down for a conference.  We wormed Juno again, then she gave me her secret recipe for an iron-building drench.  I have been drenching Juno twice a day, every day since.  It seems to finally be working, as she has perked up.  Since the drench is packed with molasses, I no longer have to wrestle her to the ground to drench her.  She sees the red drencher comes running - I dose her through the fence!

I got a new phone.  It only took most of the week and the threat of tears.  My carrier is Verizon and there are all these rules - contracts, blah, blah.  The phone my dear sister had sent was too outdated and they didn't even carry chargers for it.  With all kinds of finagling and my quivering lower lip, I was back in business Thursday night.  What a relief.

Saturday consisted mostly of my fanny in the driver's seat.  I put the ducklings out for the first time and then drove to VT to make a written report on the theft.  I then zipped back home to meet my roofer and duck house builder.  Then I drove south to get my hair done (thank God), then I drove an hour and a half to pick up a quarter pig for me and a baby beef share for my other sis, had an interesting conversation with the woman, then drove the hour and a half back home.  I did half my chores and tore out of the house to a neighbor's for a couple of glasses of wine, then back home to finish chores and feed my dogs.  That last bit was carried out under the withering beams of three sets of stink-eye.  Not one thing got done on the homestead.  Not one.

Soooo (as I am wont to say....) Sunday started at 7:30a and ended at 5:30p.  I made sure I had a lumberjack breakfast because there was going to be no lunch break.  I got the ducklings outside for their second time.  They are getting so big!  Then I started to work on the hoop house so that I could move the nuggets out of the two brooders.  This involved re-tarping it, cleaning it out (note to self: next time, don't wait a year), running electric (frost predicted) for a heat lamp, hanging feeders, finding and cleaning the big waterer and last, but not least, transporting all 30 of the fat buggers.  This was comprised of plopping a bunch of them into a box with handles, walking across the chicken yard, up-over-down the deck, across the back, through two gates and into the hoop house.  I repeated this process seven times.  I also discovered one dirty, sad, beaten down Nugget.  He/she had been smooshed, pushed and rolled in poop.  Sigh.  After I had gotten the rest in their last home, I put up the electronet and charger and focused on my patient.  I gave it a warm bath and a blow-dry.  Then I set up a little brooder in the - let's say it together: LAUNDRY ROOM (which, please note, saw no laundry done this weekend) - and let it recover.  It is a sorry thing and I don't know if it will fully recover.  But, it's warm, clean, dry and is eating and drinking.  I let the sheeples out into the back paddock for grass and managed to feed the dogs before 6P.  Not quite before the ... snow ... began.

In between, my sister and mother stopped by for her beef share.  I would usually be horrified for my mother to witness the state my house was in.  This time?  Didn't care.  I also lost a hen in a very mysterious way.  When I got back from the police station, my neighbors were hiking by and wanted eggs (and to see the ducklings), so we went into the chicken yard.  There, dead center (pardon the pun) was one of my Welsomers, neck broken, one foot pointing skyward.  There was no visible cause of death, but it looked to be violent.  She was not an old hen.  It was a shame.  (And very traumatic, apparently, for my neighbors.)  Let's hope they do not sue me.




20 comments:

  1. Your ducks are just beautiful. My, you do have quite a collection of animals...all looking quite dapper in their pics. I hope your patient gets well soon and can go back to the flock.

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    1. Theresa - I do, don't I? And it seems to happen without my noticing it.

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  2. Man your life is truly exhausting I am so tired now I need a nap. I am sorry about your Welsomers death that is very traumatic and a mystery and sad.
    As you can guess I am a lot behind in reading posts. Glad the stolen phone I knew nothing about is now worked out. I am heading to that post next. Slow down OK you tire me out;0 HUGS B

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    1. Buttons - Ha! I know how busy your life is and how hard you work! I love the tiredness that comes at the end of a physically hard day.

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    2. +1,000 to Buttons....i'm dead tired and need a nap now too!

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  3. Hummmn...I hate the mystery deaths. as to chicken injuries we found Wonder Dust from Farnam very handy for chicken pecking injuries. It stops bleeding and is antiseptic. You still cram more into your time than anyone we know!

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    1. Fiona - I was thinking maybe a cat? I had that happen once before - a cat had somehow made its way into the coop and was attacked by my rooster at the time. In defending itself, the rooster died. Who knows? Thanks for the tip - I will get some Wonder Dust, as I'm sure it works better than flour.

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  4. I used to be a stiff upper lip kind of gal but I've lately realised the threat of tears is a powerful tool. As to the hen, do you think the raised claw was an attempt to point you in the direction of the killer? So right about being where you are happiest.

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    1. Susan - Ditto. I have recently worked on perfecting the trembling bottom lip. It's usually effective on anyone older than 30.

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  5. I love a very busy time as well. We got screwed out of our weekend chores--snow, wind, blah!
    Sorry your tour for the neighbors had to feature a death. At least they see, life ain't always picture worthy.
    And Susans comment about claw pointing out the killer cracked me up!

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    1. Sue - Ack. It's that time of year when it's agony, waiting for the weather to cooperate with your burning desire to get out there and plant!

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  6. I simply don't know how you do it. Pack as much into a weekend, I mean. 'Course, I don't know how you do as much on ye ol' homestead (daily chores, tending to everyone and a bit of social-ness thrown in) each week day as you do either. When you retire (soon? soon? soon??), you may have to add to your agenda giving instructional classes to teach the rest of us how to accomplish as much as you do.

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    1. Mama Pea - Since I believe I am hard-wired into working my tuckas off, I don't know that retirement will be calmer. I sure hope not... :)

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  7. i agree with Debrs SWS - you do need a 48 hour day! but, like you, we love getting out in the garden and getting everything planted. it looks like thrusday, friday and saturday this week we'll get everything in the ground. i can't wait! it might even be warm enough for a dip in the river - i sure hope so!

    sending love. your friend,
    kymber

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  8. Susan......AKA the Duracell Bonnie...constantly going, and never slowing down LOL!!!! Can you can all of your energy and ship it this way??

    Death of a chicken in a violent manner, not good. Hopefully you'll be able to figure out what caused the chickens' death.


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  9. Wow, what a weekend you had. Theft? Did I miss something? Gosh, that is tough to find a hen in that state. I know that sight well, but us homesteaders just deal with it, right?

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  10. That was a very full weekend but also very productive.

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  11. If you ever strapped on one of those Fitbits, you'd probably be hit 10,000 steps in a hot minute! Wow!

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