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Thursday, October 17, 2019

Good golly.

Yesterday, I had to pinch hit for my middle sister and looked after my dad (97, dementia), my mom (96, almost chair-bound), my aunt (at 94, the youngster), and my BIL (basically, he tries.)  From 7:30 to 4:30.  I must have been totally delusional, bringing all my knitting projects and envisioning a cozy afternoon, knitting, tea, lalala.  Lalala for sure.  There is nothing quite so frustrating and maddening than a parent (or any person) in full-blown dementia.  I know that many of you have gone through, or are going through this painful experience, and my heart is with you.  I now believe that my sister has super powers.  I do not.  By the time I straggled home, I was exhausted.  Too exhausted to remember that we were in for a Nor'easter last night.

Fast forward to 11P, when the wind took on locomotive sound effects and the rain (what I could see through the gloom) was horizontal.  Then the power went out.  Tough nuggets, I was back to bed.  When I awoke at 3A, the lights were back on and I went around (foolishly) and reset all the clocks.  Then I made a cup of coffee, sat down with a book and the lights went out.  Will I ever learn?  The storm was still in full force, so I should have known.  I felt my way into the blackout supply area (back bathroom with it's glowy new toilet) and snagged three of my favorite solar light sources.

I sat back and listened to the storm, snugged Slimmie next to me and watched the blanketed enchilada dogs on the couch.  It was surprisingly peaceful.

The dogs, bless them, trudged out to do their business twice - we tried to time it in a lull.  Lull meaning the rain was no longer horizontal.  I went out when it was light enough to see and spent 20 minutes gathering buckets and other small objects that were all over the homestead.  I also watched the crows, who seemed to be having a ball, flying into the wind and hovering in place.

The drive into work involved dodging floods, branches, large limbs and whole trees.  I checked the rain gauge as I left and we already had four inches of rain!  It was such a relief to reach the parking garage!  Now I am off for home and the fall town rabies clinic.  After yesterday, three hours in a huge, cavernous metal building with no heat, filling hypos as fast as my little fingers can move, surrounded by an endless and frantic stream of barking dogs,screeching cats and hysterical owners, will seem like a walk in the park.

Amen.

12 comments:

Sam I Am...... said...

I am so sorry that your family is going through that and yes your sister probably needs some more help? I would love a good Nor'easter but only if I didn't have to drive to work in it. I love a good storm but nowadays you have to be careful for what you wish for! We had our clinic here last week...I didn't go. I think I'm up to date on all my shots...lol! TTYL!

ellen abbott said...

my mother's dementia was sneaky, not to make light of what you are going through. she seemed perfectly fine except, being her usual selfish and self centered self. she hid it well. didn't even know she was demented until after I shipped her off to my brother in another state and he put her in a facility. she tended to have 'clothing problems' as the administrator of the co-ed place told him. so sorry you have to deal with this. it's supposed to get down in the low 50s tonight. that's as cold as I like it.

Mama Pea said...

Not to take any of the well-deserved credit away from your sister, but remember she is well into a routine of taking care of your parents and no doubt has long ago settled into her way of dealing with it all. Bless her.

How do you get up and go to work the next morning after the storm and night you had? I would be less than worthless for the work day let alone navigating the drive to and from your place of employment. You be one tough cookie!

Susan said...

We all have our own skill set and its no good trying to match the wrong skills to a set of tasks. I'm sure you have examined your strengths and detected how best you can help your family. Storms here too, caught the last ferry home before they cancelled, choppy seas, almost brought up my supper.

Joanne Noragon said...

I an so pleased only to have lots of rain from your nor'easters.

Ed said...

I'm glad we don't get "bomb cyclones" around here.

coffeeontheporchwithme said...

Dementia - been there, done that, still doing that. Husband and daughter took "Nana" on an eight hour car ride this past summer. Needless to say, there was some repetition. I feel for you. -Jenn

Debra She Who Seeks said...

Holy moly, what a 24-hours you had!

Rain said...

We had that same storm here and lost power off and on all day yesterday. I remember the days of driving to work in storms and snowstorms, I'm so glad they are over!

Lynne said...

Just have to give you credit for everything you do!! We got the storm here with ninety mile an hour winds. Not fun, but all is well thank goodness. ox

Nancy @ Little Homestead In Boise said...

Been there with family with dementia, very tough. Glad you survived the storm. I've seen those lights, pretty cool!

Retired Knitter said...

We had rain here in the mid-atlantic but they said that once it reached your area it would be some kind of weather-bomb! Weather now is so crazy.